Bhakti

  Arti
  Chalisa
  Mantra & Shloka
  Vrat Katha
  Names
  Deities
  Bhajan
  Arya Samaj
  Festivals
  Festivals 2016

Food

  Recipe
  Contributions
  Tips & Tricks
  Glossary
  Home Remedies

Kidz Corner

  Stories
  Rhymes
  Baby Names
  Learn Hindi
  Games

Hindi Sahitya

  Kabeer
  Contributions

Indian Facts

  Map of India
  National Facts
  Ayurved
  Jyotish
  Vastu Shastra
  Yoga

NRI Zone

  Indian Missions
  Passport Visa Info
  India Travel Tips
     
 

Bhai Dooj or Yam Dwitiya

The fifth day of Deepavali or Diwali is celebrated as Bhaiya Dooj, popularly know as Bhai Dooj. The name itself denotes the day of the festival i.e it falls on Dooj, the second day after the new moon. The festival of Diwali is not complete without "Bhaiyya-Duj" in the Hindi-speaking belt, "BhavBij" in the Marathi-speaking communities, "Bhai Phota" to the Bengalees and in Nepal by the name of "Bhai-Tika".

As the legend goes Yamraj, the God of Death visited his sister Yami on this particular day. She put the auspicious tilak on his forehead, garlanded him and led him with special dishes and both of them together ate the sweets, talked and enjoyed themselves to their heart's content, while parting Yamraj gave her a special gift as a token of his love and in return Yami also gave him a lovely gift which she had made with her own hands. That is why this day of Bhayyaduj is also known by the name of "YAMA-DWITIYA"

Since then this day is being observed as a symbol of love between sisters and brothers.

In today's world when pressing everyday problems are teaming as under all the tender words of personal relationships, the celebrating of this day has its own importance in continuing to maintain the love between brothers and sisters for it is the day of food-sharing, gift-giving. On this day sisters perform puja for their brothers safety and well being. Brothers in return give gifts to their sisters as a token of love.

Another version is after killing Narakasur, Lord Krishna, went to his sister Subhadra who welcomed him in the traditional way by showing him a light and putting on his forehead a tilak of her sisterly protection. Another myth behind this begins as when Bhagawaan Mahavir found nirvana, his brother Raja Nandivardhan was distressed because he missed him and was comforted by his sister Sudarshana. Since then, women have been revered during this festival.